Educational

Social media presence for the WFP

The World Federation for Parasitologists, as of last week, now has a presence on social media. The facebook page, created last week by Christopher Weir in Melbourne, has been established as a place to discuss all things parasitology. Any meetings, notices, courses, questions, job listings and interesting journal papers from research labs can now be posted on the facebook page in addition to on the official web site of the WFP. Please help spread the word about this as we would love to see more members including students and members of the public who are interested in the world of parasites. Please also note that all material posted will be monitored to the best of Christopher's ability, so avoid anything you would deem inappropriate. The facebook page can be found either by searching face book for the World Federation of Parasitologists, or by going to https://www.facebook.com/groups/worldfederationofparasitology/

(posted by Australian Society for Parasitology at 2013-Apr-28 UTC; valid until 2018-May-22 UTC)

 

Sustaining the drive to overcome the global impact of neglected tropical diseases

Follow the link to the 2013 WHO document "Sustaining the drive to overcome the global impact of neglected tropical diseases".

Overview

The second WHO report builds on the growing sense of optimism generated by the 2012 publication of the WHO Roadmap. Commitments on the part of ministries of health in endemic countries, global health initiatives, funding agencies and philanthropists have escalated since 2010, as have donations of medicines from pharmaceutical companies and the engagement of the scientific community.

This report marks a new phase and assesses opportunities and obstacles in the control, elimination and eradication of several of these diseases. Unprecedented progress over the past two years has revealed unprecedented needs for refinements in control strategies, and new technical tools and protocols. The substantial increases in donations of medicines made since the previous report call for innovations that simplify and refine delivery strategies.

However, some diseases, including especially deadly ones like human African trypanosomiasis and visceral Leishmaniasis, remain extremely difficult and costly to treat. The control of Buruli ulcer, Chagas disease and yaws is hampered by imperfect technical tools, although recent developments for yaws look promising. The report highlights progress against these especially challenging diseases, being made through the development of innovative and intensive management strategies.

Innovations in vector control deserve more attention as playing a key part in reducing transmission and disease burden, especially for dengue, Chagas disease and the Leishmaniases.

Achieving universal health coverage with essential health interventions for neglected tropical diseases will be a powerful equalizer that abolishes distinctions between the rich and the poor, the young and the old, ethnic groups, and women and men.

(posted by Australian Society for Parasitology at 2013-Jun-05 UTC; valid until 2018-Jul-05 UTC)

 

Educational site for diseases

This site gives an overview over certain diseases (not all parasitic though) and identifies knowledge gaps and current diagnostic tools.

(posted by Australian Society for Parasitology at 2013-Jun-05 UTC; valid until 2018-Jul-05 UTC)

 

ASP interview with Dr. Hong You

Hong You graduated in 2010
with a PhD from her research
on Schistosoma japonicum
vaccine (IJP, August 2012*)
and has recently won an
NHMRC Fellowship and ASP
Network for Parasitology
Researcher Exchange Travel
Award. Hong You talks to Lisa
Jones about her research.

Click on the document link below to read the full article.

(posted by Australian Society for Parasitology at 2013-Jul-28 UTC; valid until 2018-Nov-28 UTC)

 

ASP interview with Sejal Gohil and Brian Cooke

Sejal Gohil, Lev Kats, Torsten
Seemann, Kate Fernandez,
Ghizal Siddiqui and Brian Cooke
(Monash University) recently
published their International
Journal for Parasitology article
“Bioinformatic prediction of the
exportome of Babesia bovis and
identification of novel proteins
in parasite-infected red blood
cells”. Sejal and Brian talk to
Lisa Jones about their Babesia
bovis research.

Click on the document link below for more information.

(posted by Australian Society for Parasitology at 2013-Jul-28 UTC; valid until 2018-Nov-28 UTC)

 

ASP interview with Dr Cinzia Cantacessi

Dr Cinzia Cantacessi is a
postdoctoral researcher at
the Queensland Tropical
Health Alliance Research
Laboratory, James Cook
University (Cairns). It has
been a big year for Cinzia,
being awarded The University
of Melbourne Chancellor’s
Prize for Excellenece in a PhD
Thesis and and an NHMRC
Peter Doherty - Australian
Biomedical Fellowship for
her research on “Hookworm
proteins as novel antiinflammatory
therapeutics”.
Cinzia speaks to Lisa Jones
about her career, her research
and her recent successes.

Click on the file link for more information.

(posted by Australian Society for Parasitology at 2013-Jul-28 UTC; valid until 2018-Dec-28 UTC)